HARRIET TUBMAN

 
A LIFE WORTH REMEMBERING

Harriet Tubman was born into slavery around 1822 and proceeded to work as a caretaker, maid, and lumberer.

After becoming free, Tubman proceeded to return to the South, making a total of 13 trips through the Underground Railroad.

Tubman was very religious throughout her life, often looking to God for strength and encouragement.

During the Civil War, Tubman started as a nurse for the Union Army, later becoming a scout and spy.

In the later years of her life, Tubman was greatly concerned with the Women's Suffrage movement in the late 1800s.

Important Dates in Her Life

 1820

1833

1849

1850

1819/20 Tubman was born into slavery in Dorchester County, Maryland.

Tubman suffered a head injury from a heavy weight while helping an enslaved person escape.  This injury caused seizures that affected her all her life.

Tubman escaped from slavery and travelled north to freedom.  Soon after she returned south to lead other slaves to freedom.

The Fugitive Slave Act was passed, and this meant enslaved people were no longer safe in the north, so Tubman lead them to Canada.

1861

1863

1863

1898

The Civil War began, and Tubman worked as a nurse and as a spy.

The Emancipation Proclamation was issued by President Lincoln, announcing that all slaves in the rebelling states were free.

Tubman was the first woman to lead an assault in the Civil War.

Tubman became a suffragist, speaking in major cities for women’s rights.

1908

1913

The Harriet Tubman Home for Aged and Indigent Negroes opened in Auburn, NY.

Tubman died from pneumonia in Auburn, NY in the Home named after her.

IDENTITY

Which Side of Harriet do you identify with?

Scan to Listen to a Harriet Tubman Playlist on Spotify

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